Growing A Garden

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It has been a remarkable summer for growing…lots of rain with enough sun and heat to please most crops.

And, like always, the speed at which the vegetables are growing is pretty incredible.

Take a look…

 

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This bed has bush beans (non climbing green and yellow beans), as well as climbing flat beans and potatoes – lots and lots of potatoes!

 

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I plant beautiful climbing beans on the outside of my garden because the vines make awesome red flowers.  The beans are picked late in the summer and I shell them so I can put them in the freezer and use them all winter long (like legumes as opposed to fresh green beans).

 

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Look at these tomatoes!  I swear, they were only a couple of inches tall yesterday…

 

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I found an entire tray of nasturtiums at a local nursery for only $9!  I snatched them up and planted them.  I hope their beautiful orange and red flowers grow well where I planted them because they are awesome to throw in salads…they have a peppery bite and add so much colour to the table!

 

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I have picked (and cooked!)  swiss chard 3 times already.  Peppers, eggplant, dinosaur kale, spring onions and celery are all doing well.

 

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This is the 3rd year I have had beautiful chamomile.  I think it is ready to harvest but I’m really not sure how to do it!  I know I could just Google it but I really don’t want to cut it because it smells glorious when I walk past and brush my hands over the bush!

 

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My chives are over-abundant and the spring onions have graced a salad or two on my table already.  The carrots that I seeded are coming along and the seeded cucumbers are growing well too.  My red onions, on the other hand, not so good!

Trying your hand at growing a garden tests many things – your knowledge (the more you research before you plant, the better your harvest should be), your creativity (how many different ways can we try to keep pests out of the garden naturally?), your memory (crop rotation means you need to remember where you planted last year – something that I am generally not good at!) and, finally, your patience.

Patience is a virtue…right?

 

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